Young mother Tomeeka Tomlinson has been denied a rental home 280 TIMES after being left with nothing

A young mother has found herself desperate for a new home after finding herself ‘stranded’ when her partner was killed in an accident.

Tomeeka Tomlinson was 16 weeks pregnant when she was left without a home or transport following the death of her partner in a motorbike accident in June last year.

The 19-year-old quickly had to find a new home and began the difficult journey of applying for a rental in Brisbane, Queensland.

She called Queensland’s rental crisis ‘shocking’ and says she has been turned down from 280 rental properties so far.

Young mother Tomeeka Tomlinson (pictured) claims she has been rejected for a rental 280 times as she desperately searches for a new home in a market short of rental properties

Tomlinson told the Courier Mail she ‘started looking for rentals‘ eight months ago but was ‘continuously pushed back’.

‘I applied for over 280 homes around Redbank Plains, Redbank, Goodna, Augustine Heights, Springfield, Riverview, Yamanto, Brassall and many more including [National Rental Affordability Scheme] NRAS apps,” she revealed.

Tomlinson is currently living in her overcrowded family home with her young son, now six months old, as she continues to send in applications.

She said the ‘state of the rent crisis’ in Brisbane was ‘shocking’ and left her worried about her future.

“The number of home inspections I’ve had to drag myself through with my son, it seems like the rental market right now is leaving struggling families with kids in need of street accommodation,” he said. -she adds.

It comes just weeks after a homeless single mum revealed she was at the end of her tether after also being rejected from rentals nearly 300 times.

Tomlinson says the 'state of the rent crisis' in Brisbane is 'shocking' and has her worried about her future

Tomlinson says the ‘state of the rent crisis’ in Brisbane is ‘shocking’ and has her worried about her future

It comes just weeks after homeless single mother Shikera Maher (pictured) revealed she was at the wits end after also being rejected from rentals nearly 300 times

It comes just weeks after homeless single mother Shikera Maher (pictured) revealed she was at the wits end after also being rejected from rentals nearly 300 times

House rents have increased over the past year

SYDNEY: up 17.1% to $766.70 per week

MELBOURNE: up 6.5% to $547.10 per week

BRISBANE: up to 19.5% to reach $570.80 per week

PERTH: up 13.7% to $575.70 per week

ADELAIDE: up to 15.6% to reach $494.40 per week

CANBERRA: up 16.4% to reach $768.30 per week

DARWIN: up 4.7% to $611.10 per week

HOBART: up to 4.5% to reach $511 per week

Source: SQM Research, median weekly house rent data showing annual increases over the year to March 12, 2022

Shikera Maher and her four teenagers from Ipswich spent March and February living in her car while they searched for a place to live.

Before that, Ms Maher and her children – aged 13, twins aged 15 and 18 – lived with friends for weeks.

But the domestic abuse survivor said the constant moving was too difficult given the size of the family and the fact that most of her friends live in small houses or units.

The family uses the friends’ toilet to take daily showers

‘I don’t wish the situation on anyone, not even my worst enemy,’ Ms Maher told Daily Mail Australia.

“It’s no way to live, driving from park to park because you can’t stay in one place.”

“I asked countless times if it was because of my candidacy.”

The hundreds of refusals were mostly not explained to him. Landlords and agencies just had other preferred candidates who could pay higher rent for their properties.

She said it’s not a lack of funds that’s the problem. “I have the money to pay the rent and the deposit,” Ms Maher said.

“It’s a very difficult situation. We have to hang blankets from car windows at night so people don’t look inside,” she said.

“I sleep in the driver’s seat, the 18-year-old is up front with me while the other three sleep in the back seat with all our stuff.”

“There are many meltdowns a day and constant fights stuck in the car all day.”

The family had been living in their car (pictured) after being turned down nearly 300 times for rental properties in the Ipswich area

The family had been living in their car (pictured) after being turned down nearly 300 times for rental properties in the Ipswich area

The family are looking for a four-bedroom house in Ipswich, which costs an average of $430 a week to rent in the area, with obligations around $1,043.

Ms Maher is not eligible for social housing, she said, because she has a debt she has yet to pay after one of her children, then 8, ‘destroyed’ his last place provided by the department in 2012.

Mrs. Maher and her family are on a waiting list for crisis accommodation but have not yet obtained anything.

She advocated for landlords and estate agents to have empathy for single parents and low-income people

“All we want is a roof over our heads and for our family to be safe again, even if the kids have to change schools,” she said.

Purple Cow Real Estate Springfield Lakes manager Andy Nutton told the Courier Mail that the number of homes available for rent is far outstripped by the number of people looking for a home.

“Some factors influencing the supply shortage are a reduction in the number of investors entering the market or investment properties being sold to owner-occupiers during the recent housing boom, as well as pressures in the construction industry causing delays in the availability of new construction,” he said. .

Nutton says a “high level of migration” to the sun has also boosted demand.

Widespread flooding in Queensland has been a major factor in the critical shortage of homes (Pictured: Flood-affected properties in Ipswich in March)

Widespread flooding in Queensland has been a major factor in the critical shortage of homes (Pictured: Flood-affected properties in Ipswich in March)

Another major factor in the critical housing shortage is the recent floods and wild wet weather that have devastated Brisbane and parts of Queensland.

Many residents whose homes were damaged or destroyed by the floods have relocated or are temporarily looking for new places to live.

“Floods in major cities like Brisbane, as well as in regional areas, mean that many homes have become uninhabitable or need a lot of work,” says Ray White chief economist Nerida Conisbee.

“More people will need rental accommodation, and there will now be fewer rental properties.”

Conisbee added that rental costs in Australia were also rising at the fastest rate since the global financial crisis 14 years ago.

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